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Movie Review: Mounam Pesiyathe (2002) Back to Movie
Rate movie A movie review by Balaji Balasubramaniam
Fans Rating: 80%%80%% 80% (89 votes)
Movie Still Mounam Pesiyadhe is almost like two completely different movies put together, with the pre- and post-intermission portions exhibiting completely different characteristics. Its first half boasts of some nice, interesting characters but is content with just laying the foundation for the story and never really moving things forward. On the other hand, the second half has the same characters behaving in ways that are cinematic and contrary to their earlier positions. But it makes up for this with some surprising twists and keeps us hooked by being fast-paced and never being predictable.

Gautam(Surya), a restaurant owner, is no big fan of women and hates the concept of love. His friend Kannan(Nandha) though is the exact opposite. He is in love with Maha(Maha) but still flirts with every woman he sees. Sandhya(Trisha) is Kannan's uncle's daughter and both Kannan's dad and Sandhya's parents assume that Kannan is going to wed Sandhya. But Sandhya has someone else in mind and when Gautam understands that it is him, he starts loving her too.

The way the characters have been fashioned makes sure that the movie travels along a unique path. Surya's non-belief in love leads to some nice sequences that bely our expectations. The happenings at the marriage hall where he goes to help his friend elope with the bride is one such sequence. The friend's request and the setting, which have been seen in other movies before, all point to a fight sequence or atleast a chase but the way the scene unfolds is refreshingly different(and make some nice points too). Ofcourse the director goes over the top in some places(like Surya's conversation with the married couple on the road) but these can be overlooked. Nandhaa's playful flirting with other girls inspite of having a girlfriend is another interesting quirk but in the end it seemed unnecessary since it never plays a part in the proceedings.

The second half requires us to go along with the flow without thinking about the plausibility of the characters' actions but the dividends are rich if we do so. Surya falling head over heels in love with Trisha after a few hints from her is not believable, especially considering the extent of Surya's distrust of love earlier. But if we accept rather than question it, the movie takes us on an enjoyable ride. Things happen at a fast clip and there are a lot of twists and turns in the story. We are never sure about what is going to happen next and that makes the proceedings absorbing. The end is feel-good and the way the director answers some of the open questions from before is interesting.

Though Mounam Pesiyadhe is primarily a romance, director Ameer proves that he is no slouch when it comes to action either. Surya's chase of the rowdy between(and across) the railway tracks is wonderfully picturised and the shot where he turns around to stand face to face with the rowdy is sudden and spectacular. The other arena where Ameer makes a mark is in the picturisation of the song sequences. The sequences are unique and filled with ideas and the music and photography make sure we don't walk out of the theater(or hit the fast forward button) during the songs. The song that happens instead of the fight with the drunkards, the mini-dance sequence Surya performs in his room expressing his happiness and the sad song are some of the sequences that are memorable.

Surya looks pretty much as he did in Nandhaa and fits the role well. He plays the role of the youth who doesnt believe in love well and brings out the later changes nicely through his expressions and body language. Trisha looks pretty and does what she can with a sketchily defined character. Nandhaa and Maha make a nice couple and both debutantes look comfortable in front of the camera. There is a nice special appearance towards the end too.

Rate movie A movie review by Balaji Balasubramaniam